Georges Zigrand's Blog

Back to the stone age


Heritage site signage, vitreous enamel

IMG_3329_4 copy

Heritage site signage, vitreous enamel

The national heritage agency in Luxembourg (Service des Sites et Monuments Nationaux ) has asked me to design & develop a bespoke information panel system for two distinct archeological sites.  Both sites are unsupervised, which required a simple and robust solution against weathering effects and vandalism.

The steel support structures have been designed as light & unobstrusive as possible to integrate them visually into the sensitive archeological sites.
The information panels are manufactured in the northern Vosges region in France, famous for its glass manufacturing tradition. The panels are made from vitreous enamel in one of the only remaining vitreous enamel factories in Europe. This traditional technique, where the graphics are silkscreened on low carbon steel and fired at up to 850 C°, is extremly hard-wearing, UV stable and weathering proof.

Client: SSMN (Service des Sites et Monuments Nationaux)
En collaboration avec le CNRA (Centre National de Recherche Archéologique)
Graphic design: Arnaud Mouriamé

Knockin’ on heaven’s door

Church door, star shaped
Star-shaped entrance door of a village church in Luxembourg. I really like the way the star-shaped pattern is radiating outwards from the central metal fitting, using a fairly simple profile of wooden boards. Almost psychedelic…

Old meets new

Posted in Branding, Colours, textures & surfaces, Retail environments by zigideluxe on 14/03/2015

Paul Smith shop facade, Albemarle Street


Paul Smith shop
in Albemarle Street, central London designed by 6a architects
A fantastic example on how to integrate a contemporary shop front design into a heritage environment, without resorting to pastiche. The intricacy of the contemporary cast iron panels & railings marries the texture of the old facade, making both old and new stand out.

The art of spinning

Posted in Engineering beauty, Products & furniture by zigideluxe on 09/10/2014

Allain_repoussage
It seems you have to travel to central Paris to find somebody still able to master this craft! See also this short documentary showing the process: http://vimeo.com/85024259

Thank you for your service

Barcelona street plate celebrating a traditional restaurant
I can’t speak Catalan but this plate set into the paving in front of the long established Deli/Restaurant ‘Can Ravell’ in Barcelona says something like: ‘In the name of the City of Barcelona – in recognition to Ravell for its many years of service to the city’.

The plate seems to regroup many symbols of trade and craft and I suppose the City of Barcelona sets these plates in front of their most long serving, authentic and traditional businesses that make the city so special. What a great initiative! And the food was even better!!

Bring back the craftsmanship – Embossing leather

Posted in Colours, textures & surfaces, Products & furniture by zigideluxe on 24/04/2012

Embossing leather is another one of these crafts that are very difficult to still find but have a great creative potential. This very old, worn and grotty  leather embossed folder almost blends in with the wooden desk and is getting more beautiful by the day.
Beautifully crafted natural materials have this quality of ageing well and are able to take the wear and tear of life. Something that many more contemporary materials and finishes simply can’t take.

Bring back the craftsmanship – Art & Craft

Posted in Colours, textures & surfaces, Products & furniture by zigideluxe on 19/04/2012

Photo by Richard-Max Tremblay

Another fine example of upholstery craft – by the artist Yannick Pouliot in his work Régence: monomaniaque.

Bring back the craftsmanship – upholstery

Posted in Colours, textures & surfaces, Products & furniture by zigideluxe on 26/03/2012

innovative upholstered bench

Good craftsmanship is key to produce fine quality objects. Unfortunately, outside the luxury industry, they are hard to find. With labour costs going constantly up are we loosing all the fine techniques that made objects special? It seems a shame, but it motivates me even more to collaborate with skilled craftsmen on the next projects!

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